Real-Time Ship Information

Real-Time
Ship Data

Backup Data

  • Click on the Real-Time Ship Data above. You are looking at a map which shows various regions around the world.

    1. Select a region

    2. Click on "Marine Observations"

  • What color dots represent the ships? [Hint: read paragraph below map] What color dots represent buoys? What do the purple dots represent? 

  • These are REAL ships and REAL buoys all reporting a wide range of atmospheric and oceanic data back to the United States through the Internet. The flags on the dots represent the wind speed and direction at that location (see bottom of map page for further explanation). The contour lines represents lines of constant pressure.

  • Note the time and date stamp right above the map. How current is this information?

  • Note that there is a four- or five-character code at the bottom right corner of each ship dot.  This is called the Ship ID Code and is unique to each ship.

  • If you stay on any real-time data site for a while you may want to click on the "reload" or "refresh" button to ensure you are getting the most up-to-date information.

  • Use this map to track a cargo ship in real-time as it crosses the ocean.  Determine the ship's speed each day and its estimated time of arrival to a specific port of call.

  • Have students predict how weather may influence a ship's course.

  • Geography - Learn about different countries and time zones

  • Social Studies - Research what life is like in different ports of call

  • Language Arts - Write a story about being a stowaway on a ship

  • Math - Determine rate of travel for the ship 

  • The Stowaway Adventure: In this project students use real-time data from the Internet to track a real ship at sea, determine its destination and predict when it will arrive. In addition, they will have the opportunity to monitor the weather conditions at sea and predict when rough weather might impact on the ship's arrival time. Here are the curriculum standards satisfied by the project.

Copyright 2004 Stevens Institute of Technology
Center for Innovation in Engineering and Science Education 
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