A CIESE Realtime Data Project

TEACHERS: Weather's Role


Objectives
Students will:

  • collect and analyze data for a high ground level ozone day and a low ground level ozone day
  • make comparisons and determinations about ozone levels utilizing graphing skills
  • learn that ground level ozone may be abundant when VOCs, NOx, and intense sunlight are present

Materials

Assessment

  1. For homework, the students will repeat the procedure, steps 1 - 7, but use the following links to look at examples of low ground level ozone days.  The students should obtain another copy of the Student Worksheet and use the following links to complete the homework assignment:

AIRNow

Boston, MA

Trenton, NJ

Charlotte, NC

St. Louis, MO

Houston, TX

Sacramento, CA

Weather Underground:

Boston, MA

Trenton, NJ

Charlotte, NC

St. Louis, MO

Houston, TX

Sacramento, CA

  1. The student responses to the questions on the Student Worksheet(s) can provide insight as to student understanding of the topic. 

Implementation Tips

This introductory lesson actually uses archived images, which will offer greater flexibility to prepare for the lesson if you are expecting network failure, or cannot get into the computer lab.

If there are not enough computers for students, you could:

  • create small working groups
  • project the images and weather data for the class using an LCD projector
  • arrange to take your class or small group of students to the Internet access computer on a regular basis for data collection
  • collaborate with the Computer Teacher

If the network is slow or not working, you could:

  • print the images and weather data on overheads and use the overhead project to project the images for the class
  • print and/or photocopy the images and weather data, enough for small student working groups
  • save the images to disk

Notes
Please refer to the Graphing Tips and Examples for assistance.

Graphing Cloud Cover/Conditions (Sunlight) - optional
This graph is optional and increases the complexity of the lesson. To graph Cloud Cover versus Time, use the chart below.  The chart lists various sky conditions (terminology may be subjective) with a numerical value associated with each condition to ease the students' ability to graph the data.

The Cloud Cover data, gathered from the Weather Underground site, specifically, the "Conditions" column, refers to the Cloud Cover visible in the sky.  Cloud Cover is often judged by the scale below and expressed in one of four terms, Clear, Scattered, Broken, and Overcast.  For graphing purposes, the terms need to be expressed with a numerical value.  In addition to explaining the conversion to your students, it may be necessary to point out that the amount of cloud cover has a direct relationship with the amount of sunlight, and the amount of sunlight has a relationship with the amount of ground level ozone generated during the day.

Cloud Cover/Conditions % Cloud Cover

Clear

0% > 10%
Scattered (includes Partly Cloudy) 10% - 50%
Broken (includes Mostly Cloudy) 50% - 90%
Overcast 90% +